IMPACT OF UNIVERSAL CREDIT ON PEOPLE WITH A DISABILITY: lESSONS TO BE LEARNED AND THE WAY FORWARD IN sCOTLAND

Supported by:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                               

Central Glasgow: 24 May 2018

 

Cost to Attend:
Public & Private Sector £99 + VAT
3rd sector & Charitable Organisations £89 + VAT                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        Universal Credit was devised by the Coalition Govt at Westminster to simplify benefits, ensure it paid to be in work, tackle poverty and reduce fraud and error. Not initially intended to reduce budgets it was to be paid out at broadly similar rates as the legacy benefits it replaced. In 2015 the the Budget Autumn Statement significantly reformed the way Universal Credit was to be calculated, making it less generous and the Institute of Fiscal Studies expected more families to lose than gain under the revised calculations.

 

The East Lothian was selected as the first Scottish Local Authority to implement full service Universal Credit and the regions CAB’s commissioned research into the financial, emotional and social impacts on it’s clients. East Lothian Council also reviewed the impact Universal Credit of Universal Credit on council tax and housing rental income and the effect it was having on benefit claimants.

This 1/2 day workshop will consider what lessons can be learned from the East Lothian experience and hear from representatives from Scottish & local govt and 3rd sector organisations on what needs to be done to create a fairer, more equitable and efficient benefit system in Scotland that treats people with people with dignity and respect.

  • Confirmed Speakers -:

  • Yvonne Cassidy & Sarah Baldry – East Lothian Citizens Advice Buruea’s
  • Sylvia Archibald  & Irene McArthy – ELCAP
  • John Cunningham, Benefits & Financial Administration, East Lothian Council
  • David Wallace, Social Security Agency Implementation, Scottish Government
  • Steven McAvoy, Enable
  • Chris Creegan, Cheif Executive SCLD

 

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WHAT SHOULD SUPPORTED DECISION MAKING LOOK LIKE IN SCOTLAND
Dates: Glasgow 14 March & Edinburgh 26 March
 
Delegates have the choice of regional workshops  from (1.30pm – 4.30pm)
COST TO ATTEND: £99 (Public & private sectors); £89 (3rd sector & charitable organisations)

 

Along with proposals for reform of the Adults, with Incapacity legislation, which the Scottish Government is currently consulting on views are being sought by the Scottish Government on the future shape and structure of supported decision making and these ½ day workshops are to enable Health & Social Care practitioners and legal professionals to examine the issues that need to be taken into consideration.

Each workshop will include an overview by Kirsty McGrath, Head of Policy -Reform of Adults with Incapacity legislation Health and Social Care Directorate at the Scottish Government followed by a Panel Discussion with representatives from MWC Scotland, Office of the Public Guardian, Local Government & a Scottish Law firm.

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) sets a clear expectation that signatories (including the UK) ‘shall take appropriate steps to provide access by persons with disabilities to the support they may require in exercising their legal capacity’. Some countries have passed laws which give formal legal recognition to supported decision making.

This workshop provides an opportunity for health & social care practitioners working in the public and 3rd sectors and legal professionals to debate and consider the best fit for supported decision making in Scotland.

 

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